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Home » Top 10 North India Itineraries For First Time Visitors

Extensive North India Tour

Duration of Trip: 34 Nights / 35 Days
Places Covered: Delhi - Amritsar - Chandigarh - Shimla - Delhi - Gwalior - Khajuraho - Varanasi - Delhi - Mandawa - Bikaner - Jaisalmer - Jodhpur - Udaipur - Deogarh - Nimaj - Jaipur - Ranthambhore - Agra - Delhi

This extensive tour is over a month long and covers most of the major landmarks of Delhi, Chandigarh, Punjab, Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh as well as a hill resort in Himachal Pradesh known as Shimla, which was the Summer Capital of India during the British Raj period. While Taj Mahal at Agra is an elegy in marble, the Lake Palace of Udaipur was the romantic summer getaway of Maharaja of Udaipur who came here to spend a pleasurable evening with his favoured concubines. Mandawa in the Shekhawati region is an open art gallery with its remarkable and colorful frescoes while the Golden Temple of Amritsar is one of the holiest shrines for Sikhs. An ultimate tour for explorers and those who are interested in studying Indian culture, this tour offers numerous excitements and exotic elements to keep your mind busy throughout the trip.


Day 01: Arrival at Delhi
Reach Delhi and transfer to your hotel. Check in and relax for the night.

Day 02: Delhi
After breakfast proceed for a day sightseeing tour of the city. Start with the sightseeing of Old Delhi. The tour will begin with a visit to Raj Ghat, a simple memorial to Mahatma Gandhi; drive past the Red Fort continuing to the Jama Masjid by bicycle rickshaws, one of Asia’s largest mosques. The magnificent Red Fort, overlooking the river Jamuna was built during the years 1638 - 48 when the Moghul Empire was at its peak. The tour continues to Jama Masjid, one of Asia’s largest mosques and which is viewed from the outside.

New Delhi will include the Qutub Minar, the tallest stone tower in India. The tour also includes a drive past the imposing India Gate, the Parliament building and the Rastrapathi Bhawan, the President’s residence. If time permits then visit the Lotus temple located in south of Delhi. It is lotus shaped and has rightly been given the name.

Enjoy the Dances Of India Show in the evening. Overnight will be in Delhi.

Day 03: Delhi - Amritsar (By Deluxe Train in 6 hr {afternoon train})
Proceed to the station at leisure for afternoon train. Board Shatabdi Express to Amritsar.

Amritsar, home to the Golden Temple is one of the most ancient and fascinating cities of India. It is an important seat of Sikh history and culture.

In the evening enjoy the PunjabiCuisine and roam in the old market of the city. Overnight will be in Amritsar.

Agra-FortDay 04: Amritsar
Breakfast will be at the hotel. Visit the India Pakistan Border for a dress parade. (Gate Opening Ceremony)

Wagha Border: The international border between India and Pakistan. The pomp and pageantry of the Beating Retreat and the Change of Guard within handshaking distance of the Indian and Pakistani forces makes for a most charming spectacle.

Start a day tour of the city visiting Golden Temple, the Jalianwala Bagh and the summer palace in the city.

Golden Temple:Sri Harmandir Sahib, also know as the Golden Temple in Amritsar is the holiest shrine of the Sikh religion. Also known as the Shri Darbar Shaib, it is in the center of the old part of Amritsar. The Golden Temple sits on a rectangular platform, surrounded by a pool of water called the Amrit Sarovar from which the City is named. The entrance to the Golden Temple complex is through an ornate archway with intricate inlay work. Verses from the Granth Sahib are inscribed on the doorway. The main north entrance is under a Victorian clock tower. Known as the Darshani Deori, the entrance is up a flight of steps and down again to the temple and holy tank. The temple is a two storey marble structure reached by a causeway known as Guru´s Bridge. The lower storey is in white marble with the walls decorated with inlaid flower and animal motifs in the pietradura style of the Taj Mahal. The architecture of the golden temple is a blend of the Hindu and Muslim styles. The temple building has four entrances instead of the usual single entry. This is symbolic of the openness of Sikhism and indicates that followers of all faiths are allowed inside. The walls within are decorated with carved wooden panels and elaborate inlay work in silver and gold. The Adi Granth, compiled by Guru Arjan Dev, rests on a throne beneath a jewel-encrusted canopy. Priests conduct continuous recitation of verses from the holy book in 3-hour shifts. A complete reading of the text stakes 48 hours. The original copy of the Guru Granth Sahib is kept under pink shroud in the, Golden Temple during the day and at around 10 p.m. each day is ceremoniously returned to the Akal Takht (Sikh Parliament) building. The morning processional ceremony takes place at 4 AM in summer and at 5 AM in winter, when Sri Guru Granth Sahib is bought from Akal takhat Sahib in a procession to the Sanctum Sanctorum, which is washed with milk. The Akal Takht, next to the Golden Temple, is the seat of the Shiromani Gurudwara Prabandhak Committee, the religious governing body of the Sikhs. The building of the Akal Takht was begun by Guru Arjan Dev and completed in 1609 by Guru Hargobind.  If you miss the early morning or evening processions, the palanquin that bears the Adi Granth can be seen in the treasury room on the first floor of the Akal Takht. The palanquin is set with precious stones and has silver poles and a gold canopy.

Jalian Wala Bagh: This place noted for its most notorious massacre under British rule. It is 400 meters north of the Golden Temple. The British General Dyer was the Lieutenant Governor of the province in 1919. He banned all meetings and demonstrations led by Indians against the economical set back by World War I. On 13 April 1919, pilgrims poured into Amritsar to celebrate the Baisakhi festival, a holiday in the Sikh calendar. In the afternoon thousands of people gathered at Jallian Wala Bagh to celebrate the Baisakhi. This ground surrounded by high walls on all sides has only a narrow alley for access. General Dyer personally led the troops to the sight and ordered his men to open fire without any warning. It resulted in the death of 379 and injured more than 1200. India was outraged by Dyers massacre. Gandhiji, called for a nation wide strike and started the Non-cooperation Movement, which became an important mile stone in the struggle for Independence. Today this ground has been changed to a park and it has a pleasant garden. There is a well on the north side in which many people who tried to escape from the bullets were drowned, and remnants of walls have been preserved to show the bullet holes. At the east end of the garden there is a large memorial built in memory of those who died here.

Summer place of Maharaja Ranjit Singh: Is situated in the middle of a beautiful garden called Ram bagh. This garden is laid out on the pattern of Shalimar Bagh at Lahore. Only its architecturally unique ´darshani deorhi´ has remained intact. A museum after the name of the Maharaja is set up here displaying oil paintings, miniatures, coins, abd weapons relating to the Sikh period.

Overnight will be in Amritsar.

Day 05: Amritsar - Chandigarh (By road 200 km in 4 hr)
Breakfast will be at the hotel. Proceed by road to Chandigarh passing through the most prosperous villages and small towns.

The name of the city is derived from Goddess of power known as Shri Chandika whose temple is on Chandigarh-Kalka Road. The temple is known by the name of Chandi Mandir. It is considered to be an ancient site and has a major religious significance for Hindus.

After India's independence from British rule Punjab became a state without a capital. Though there was a temporary secretariat at Shimla in Himachal Pradesh, the political leadership decided on the construction of a modern and accessible capital. This was Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru's Dream City of modern India. The city was named as Chandigarh. This is the first planned city of India.

The responsibility for the design was given to the French architect Le Corbusier or The Crow. With the help of his cousin Pierre Jeanneret, and that of the English couple Maxwell Fry and Jane Drew (along with a number of Indian architects prominent amongst them Chief planner Narinder S. Lamba & Chief Engineer J.C. Verma) Chandigarh, the present capital, came into existence at the foothills of the Shivaliks (the first of three parallel chains of the Himalayas).

It was built in 1953 and serves as the capital of two states, i.e. Punjab and Haryana. It is administered by the Central Government and is hence classified as a Union Territory. Since 1986 there has been much talk about officially handling it to Punjab on the basis of demography. The issue however continues to be a matter of discussion with many political disputes.

In the evening visit the markets or relax at the hotel.

Overnight will be at Chandigarh.

Day 06: Chandigarh
Breakfast will be at the hotel. Enjoy sightseeing of the following places:

Sukhna Lake: On the south eastern boundary of the city is the seasonal rivulet Sukhana choe. Water through it used to flow away in the rainy season. The planner of the city through their imagination, created a lake by obstructing the flow of rain water through the Sukhana Choe. A three and half km long dam was built to create a reservoir of water. It is now known as Sukhna Lake. People generally come here for a morning or evening walk. It consists of an eating place, children’s park. It also has facility for boating and rafting for the adventure seekers. A major hit with children and grown-ups alike. At one end of the Lake are the premises of Lake Club. The club management takes care to provide facilities for water sports and recreational activities. Water sports become annual feature. Environment friendly people of Chandigarh take part in its disilting operation every year.

Rock Garden: Next to Sukhana Lake there is a unique but a world famous fantasy in the city of Chandigarh, called Rock Garden. Situated in the thick forest area, these gardens hold its own charms for the visitors. It is full of objects built from household and industrial waste. There are no flowers or plants in this garden. The object to be seen there are the figure made of raw cement resembling humans and animals. These figures have been decorated with broken but colourful odds and ends of China clay. As one looks at them with deep intent, they seem to be staring as the visitors. They seem to be engaged in various activities. There are group of dancing damsels made from bicycle and motorcycle's waste materials, marching armies of warriors resting flying or fledging birds made from countless bite of broken glass. There are groups of music bands engaged in their activity of entertaining the visitors. Its creator also needs a mention. The garden was visualised by Sh. Nek Chand. He belongs from Gurdaspur district in Punjab province. He started his life in PWD as laborer, but late rose to high ranks. He came to Chandigarh as Road Inspector. His deep visualization made him to pick and collect all sorts of discarded scrap. He started to visit waste dumps of the factories. He collected there raw cement, broken pipes and other discarded matter. He created rapport with the truck drivers who carried and drop his debris at a vacant corner of the forest where now this unique creation stands. For twelve years he worked hard alone on this unique fantasy. After twelve years the work of Nek Chand noticed by Government. He was giving deserving patronage. An area of twelve acres was allotted for the extension of the original Rock Garden. Even funds were provided for carrying on the work.

Rose Garden: Next to city centre, in sector 16 is situated Zakir Hussein Rose Garden Asia's largest Rose Garden and is spread over 30 acres of land having over 1600 different species or roses. These have been planted in beautifully carved out lawns and flowers beds. Like the cultural zone which is just across the road in Sector 10, this was also planned by Dr. M.S. Randhawa as his interest in horticulture and fondness for flowers was profuse.

Drive through the city enjoying the planning and architecture of the city.

Overnight will be at Chandigarh.

Agra-Fort Day 07: Chandigarh - Shimla (By Toy Train)
Breakfast will be at the hotel.

Enjoy the train (one of the most beautiful train journeys in India) ride to Shimla.

Shimla – the capital of Himachal Pradesh and former summer capital of British India, Shimla is the state’s most important centre. Bulging at its seams with unprecedented expansion, Shimla retains a colonial aura, with its grand old buildings.

Reach and check in at hotel.

Enjoy the hotel – a heritage bulding built by the British when this was their summer capital.

Enjoy the evening at The Ridge / Scandal Point – the hub of the town with its ice-cream vendors, pony rides and spectacular Himalayan views.

Overnight will be at Shimla.

Day 08: Shimla
After breakfast proceed for a stroll in the mall or pick souvenirs and curios at Lakkar Bazaar.

Explore the scenic places around Shimla – Naldhera with its rolling meadows and a 9 hole golf course,  Mashobra with its pine forests offering lovely walks, specially the pathways from Bekalty Road, Kufri's famed ski slopes and the small zoo and Chail with its romantic palace, deodar forests, not to forget  its highest cricket pitch. The area has breathtaking views of the Himalayan peaks foreshadowed by the terraced fields and verdant forests. In the evening soak in the ambience of this old world town, going shopping on the fashionable Mall.

In the evening, pamper yourself at the facilities of the resort. Overnight will be at Shimla.

Day 09: Shimla - Delhi (By road & train: 75 km in 2 hr by road)
Enjoy breakfast and then drive down to Kalka for a train journey (deluxe super-fast train and it takes 6 hr) to Delhi. Snacks and dinner will be served on the train.

Reach and check in a hotel close to the airport in Delhi.

Day 10: Delhi - Gwalior
By deluxe train (Shatabdi Express)

Take early morning train to Gwalior. Breakfast will be served on the train.

Gwalior: A little southward of Agra is the ancient city of Gwalior. Centuries of history can be witnessed even today in its monuments, temples, museums and cultural traditions. The magnificent Gwalior Fort, with its reflections of art, religion and military might, is an enduring symbol of this glorious past. The colorful history of this city dates back to the eight century and is a mosaic of Rajput clans of the Pratihasas, Kachwahas and Tomars, each leaving their marks on the city’s magnificent monuments. Gwalior's history is traced back to a legend in 8th century AD when a chief tain known as Suraj Sen was struck by a deadly disease and cured by a hermit-saint Gwalipa. As a gratitude for that incidence, he founded this city by his name.  The new city of Gwalior became existence over the centuries.  The cradle of great dynasties ruled the city Gwalior.  With different Dynasty, the city gained a new dimension from the warrior kings, poets, musicians, and saints who contributed to making it renowned throughout the country. The city is also the setting for the memorials of freedom fighters such as Tatya Tope and the indomitable Rani of Jhansi. Today the old settings stand side by side with the trappings of modernity.

Check in at the hotel and relax for the afternoon enjoying the spa.

In the evening proceed for the Sound & Light Show at the fort.

Overnight will be at Gwalior.

Day 11: Gwalior
Breakfast will be at the hotel. Proceed for a sightseeing tour of the city visiting the following interesting monuments.

Gwalior Fort: Standing on a steep mass of sandstone, Gwalior Fort dominates the city and is its most significant monument. It has been the scene of momentous events, imprisonment, battles and jauhars. A steep road winds upwards to the fort, flanked by statues of the Jain tirthankaras, carved into the rock face. The magnificent outer walls of the fort still stand, two miles in length and 35 feet high, bearing witness to its reputation for being one of the most invincible forts of India. This imposing structure inspired Emperor Babur to describe it as “the pearl amongst the fortresses of Hind ".

Man Mandir Palace: Built between 1486 and 1517 by Raja Mansingh.The tiles that once adorned its exterior have not survived, but at the entrance, traces of these still remain. Vast chambers with fine stone screens were once the music halls, and behind these screens, the royal ladies would learn music from the great masters of the day. Below, circular dungeons housed the state prisoners of the Mughals. Emperor Aurangzeb had his brother, Murad imprisoned, and later executed here. Close by is Jauhar Pond, where in the Rajput tradition, the Ranis committed mass sati after their consorts had been defeated in battle. At Man Mandir Palace, a poignant ambience of those days of chivalry and heroism still lingers in the silent chambers.

Gujari Mahal: Within the fort are some marvels of medieval architecture. The 15th century Gujari Mahal is a monument to the love of Raja Mansingh Tomar for his intrepid Gujar Queen, Mrignayani. The outer structure of Gujari Mahal has survived in an almost total state of preservation; the interior has been converted into Archaeological Museum housing rare antiquities, some of them dating back to the 1st century A.D. Even though many of these have been defaced by the iconoclastic Mughals, their perfection of form has survived the ravages of time. Particularly worth seeing is the statue of Shalbhanjika from Gyraspur, the tree goddess, the epitome of perfection in miniature. The statue is kept in the custody of the museum's curator, and can be seen on request.

Sas Bahu ka Mandir: Two architecturally beautiful 11th century temples.

Jai Vilas Palace: A splendor of a different kind exists in the Jai Vilas Palace, current residence of the Scindia family. Some 25 rooms have been turned into the Jivaji Rao Scindia Museum, and in these rooms, so evocative of a regal lifestyle, the past comes alive. Jai Vilas is an Italianate structure which combines the Tuscan and Corinthian architectural modes. The imposing Darbar Hall has two central chandeliers weighing a couple of tonnes, and hung only after ten elephants had tested the strength of the roof. Ceilings picked out in gilt, heavy draperies and tapestries, fine Persian carpets and antique furniture from France and Italy are the features of these spacious rooms. Eye catching treasures include: a silver train with cut glass wagons which served guests as it chugged around the table on miniature rails; a glass cradle from Italy used for the baby Krishna each Janmashtami, silver dinner services and swords that were once worn by Aurangzeb and Shah Jahan. These are, besides, personal mementoes of past members of the Scindia family: the jeweled slippers that belonged to Chinkoo Rani, four-poster beds and gifts from practically every country in the world, hunting trophies and portraits. The Scindia Museum offers an unparalled glimpse into the rich culture and lifestyle of princely India.

Sun Temple: Located near the Residency at Morar, the newly constructed Sun Temple takes its inspiration from the famous Konark Sun Temple in Orissa.

Ghaus Mohammed's Tomb

The sandstone mausoleum of the Afghan prince, Ghaus Mohammed, is also designed on early Mughal lines. Particularly exquisite are the screens which use the pierced stone technique as delicate as lace.

Gurudwara Data Bandhi Chhod

It was built in the memory of Guru Hargobind Saheb, the 6th Sikh Guru who was imprisoned here by Emperor Jehangir for over two years. It is located on the Gwalior Fort.

Sarod Ghar: This Museum of Music has been set up in the old ancestral house of the legendary Ustad Hafiz Ali Khan. It houses ancient instruments of the great Indian Masters of yesteryears. It also houses an impressive collection of photographs and documents. Sarod Ghar is a unique institution devoted to promoting Indian classical music, heritage and culture. Through this 'window' to the past, music lovers can gain a better understanding of the evolution and history of our classical music and a deeper perspective and insight into the context of the art as it exists today.

Enjoy the evening at the hotel. Overnight will be at Gwalior. Agra-Fort

 Day 12: Gwalior - Khajuraho (By road 200 km in 5 hr)
Breakfast will be at hotel. Drive to Orchha on the way to Khajuraho.

Orchha is a medieval city founded by the Bundela rulers with palaces and temples of the 16th & 17th century – which has remarkably withstood the onslaught of time. The town is known for its CHATTRIS which were built in the memory of the kings and the place is flanked by the river Betwa.

Proceed for sightseeing of Orchha sites within the Fort Complex. Enjoy your lunch at Orchha.

Continue drive to Khajuraho.

Situated in the northernmost part of Madhya Pradesh, Khajuraho is famous for its enchanting temples and its legendary Khajuraho dance festival. The name Khajuraho is derived from the Khajur tree (the date palm tree) which is grown abundantly in the region. The Khajuraho Temples are dedicated to a celebration of womanhood, her myriad moods and facets. Famous for its erotic architecture, the carvings include, women writing a letter, applying eye makeup, combing her tresses, dancing & playing with her child. Her innocent, blushed, charming, seductive, ardent beauty, all depicted in exquisitely sculptured details. These temples have been designed and carved to lead the eyes from ground level upward till you seem to be looking at heaven.

In the evening proceed for the Sound And Light Show and retire for the night.

Overnight will be at Khajuraho.

 Day 13: Khajuraho

Breakfast will be at the hotel.

Start sightseeing of the Western Set Of Temples. (The rest of them)

Return to hotel for lunch.

After lunch towards late afternoon (when the weather is more pleasant) visit the Eastern Temples And Jain Temples.

In the evening visit the villages or relax at the hotel.

Overnight will be at Khajuraho.

Day 14: Khajuraho - Varanasi
By Air
Flight :
9W 724 (Jet Airways)
Departure : 1330 hr
Arrival : 1410 hr

Breakfast will be at hotel.

Transfer in time to airport for flight to Varanasi. Upon arrival at Varanasi, you will be met and transferred to hotel.

Varanasi: Picturesquely situated on the crescent shaped left bank of the holy River Ganges, Varanasi, one of the ancient seats of learning in India, is said to be a compound of the names of two streams, the Varuna and the Assi, which still flow in the north and south of the city respectively. This name seems to have been corrupted, in medieval times to Varanasi, which was in use till May 1956, when it was changed to Varanasi, by an order of the Government of India. Varanasi is probably one of the most ancient living cities in India. From time immemorial it has been a great religious center for Hindus and one of their most sacred places of pilgrimage, being visited by millions of people every year. To every visitor Varanasi offers a breathtaking experience. The rays of the dawn shimmering across the Ganges; the high-banks; the temples and shrines along the banks bathed in a golden hue …soul stirring hymns and mantras along with the fragrance of incense filling the air…and the refreshing dip in the holy waters gently splashing at the Ghats. Varanasi – The land where experience and discovery reach the ultimate bliss. Varanasi is also renowned for its rich tapestry of music, arts, crafts and education. Some of the world – renowned exponents India has produced in these fields were schooled in Varanasi’s cultural ethos. Luminaries apart, Varanasi abounds in the art of silk weaving, an exotic work of art which manifests itself in precious Banarasi silk sarees and silk brocades which are cherished as collector’s items across the world today.

Visit Sarnath 5 miles out of Varanasi: The great Buddha enhanced the sanctity of Varanasi by choosing the environs of the city to preach his first sermon at Sarnath, (only 10 Kms away) after attaining enlightenment. Later, Ashoka, the great Mauryan Emperor erected magnificent stupas and other buildings along with his mighty stone pillar, Dharmarajika Stupa. The 110 ft. tall Damekh Stupa marks the place where Buddha preached first sermon.Sarnath has been a premier centre for Buddhism. It is a rich collection of ancient Buddhist relics and antiques comprising numerous Buddha and Bodhisatva images on display at the Archaeological Museum (1000 hrs to 1700 hrs. Open all days except Friday)

Enjoy the evening AARTI at the GHATS. The guide will be giving a commentary to you on the proceedings and meanings of the chants during the AARTI of the river.

Overnight will be spent at Varanasi.

Day 15: Varanasi
For you to appreciate this remarkable city, we'll transfer you to the banks of the River Ganges before the sun rises. (To start at 0500 hrs. for the best lifetime experience)

The Ghats – Pilgrims flock the Ghats to have a ritual bath and perform puja to the rising sun, following centuries old tradition. The Dasashvamedh Ghat offers a splendid view of the river front. This is the ghat of the 10 (Das) horses (shiva) sacrificed (medh). Legend has it that it was performed by Brahma to pave way for Shiva’s return to Varanasi after a spell of banishment. This has remained unchanged by time, war or even man himself.

Board a boat with your guide and proceed to the middle of the river, where at sunrise the sight unfolds before you. Thousands of faithful come daily to the banks to bathe and pray while in the background, temples and palaces rise in tiers from the water's edge. Then return for a walk through the cobblestone streets along the banks of "Ganga". As shops are opening, the place now becomes a beehive of activity as the faithful are coming and going. Visit the Kashi Vishwanath Temple while returning to the hotel.

Return for breakfast to the hotel.

Proceed for day guided tour of Varanasi including the Bharat Mata Temple, which features a big relief map of Mother India engraved in marble. Also visit the 18th century Durga Temple, commonly known as the Monkey Temple due to the huge population of the monkeys. Proceed to the Tulsi Manas Temple, crafted from white marble which features the entire Ramayana inscribed on its walls. Also visit the BHU considered as the biggest residential university in Asia. The University Campus houses an Art Gallery and the Mosque of Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb.

Vishwanath Temple: Dedicated to Lord Shiva, this temple is the most sacred shrine in Varanasi. The original temple was destroyed by the Mughal Emperor, Aurangzeb which was later restored by Rani Ahilyabai of Indore in the 18th century. The Gold plating of the dome was done during the 19th century by Maharaja Ranjit Singh of Punjab. Foreigner’s entry restricted.

Banaras Hindu University: Founded by Pundit Madan Mohan Malviya it is considered to be the largest residential university in Asia. Within the university campus, Vishwanath Temple and Bharat Kala Kendra (Museum) are well worth a visit. Overnight will be in Varanasi.Agra-Fort

Day 16: Varanasi - Delhi
By Air
Flight : IC 805 (Indian Airlines)
Departure : 1540 hr
Arrival : 1700 hr

Breakfast will be at the hotel. Take a leisurely trip to the city if you want or relax at the hotel. Proceed to the airport for flight to Delhi. Reach and check in at hotel. Enjoy a visit to the DELHI HAAT in the evening. Overnight will be at Delhi.

Day 17: Delhi - Mandawa (By Road 250 km/6 hr)
Proceed for Mandawa after breakfast.

The medieval Fort of Mandawa gradually rises on the horizon like a mirage. A breathtaking view of the town can be seen from the terrace of Castle Mandawa. Precious collection of arms with jade handles, traditional ceremonial costumes can be seen at the Museum at the Castle. The havelies worth a visit are Chokhani, Saraf, Goenka and Ladia in this town. It was built in 1775 by Thakur Nawal Singh, descendant of Rao Shekhaji, who also founded the city of Nawalgarh. The Castle, now a 51 room hotel has no two rooms alike. It also houses an interesting collection of paintings, jade, costumes and antiques.

The courtyard and the terrace come to live during evenings with candle-lit dinners and fire-dances during the season. It is a two hundred and forty year old fortress, which has been converted by the family into a fine example of traditional hospitality.

Reach and check in at hotel. Overnight will be at Mandawa.

Day 18: Mandawa - Bikaner (By Road 180 km/4 hr)
Breakfast will be at hotel.

Take a walking tour of the painted 'havelis' of some of the leading business families of the country. Though they no longer live here, the local caretakers are happy to show the visitors around. Chowkhani Haveli, Gulab Rai Ladia Haveli, Lakshminarayan Ladia Haveli, Mohahanlal Saraf Haveli and Bhagchandika Haveli are of special interest. Spend the major part of the day looking into frescoes.

Also visit Mahensar and meet the local village chief who is also one of the best wine makers in Rajasthan.

Proceed to Bikaner. Reach and check in at hotel.

Bikaner – The royal fortified city with a timeless appeal. Lying in the north of the Desert State, the city is dotted with many sand dunes. Bikaner retains the medieval splendor that pervades the city’s lifestyle.

More popularly called the camel country, the city is renowned for the best riding camels in the world. The ship of the desert is an inseparable part of life here. Be it pulling heavy carts, transporting grains or working on wells, camels are the prime helpers. The wells of Bikaner - an important source of water are other attractions of the city. These are built on high plinths with slender minareted towers on each of the Four Corners and can be noticed even from a distance.

Relax in the evening. Overnight will be at Bikaner.

Day 19: Bikaner - Jaisalmer (By Road 330 km/5 hr)
Breakfast will be at hotel. Proceed for sightseeing tour of Bikaner.

Rao Bikaji, a descendant of Jodhaji – the founder of Jodhpur, founded this desert town in the North of the state in 1488. Visit the Junagarh Fort, constructed between 1588 and 1593 by Raja Jai Singh, a general in the Moghul Emperor Akbar's army. The city is known for its step wells so visit one ancient well and then the famous KARNI MATA temple.

Start for Jaisalmer by noon. Enjoy lunch on the way.

Reach and proceed to the hotel.

Rising from the heart of the Thar Desert like a golden mirage is the city of Jaisalmer. A commanding fort etched in yellow sandstone stands, with its awesome splendor, dominating the amber-hued city.

The city has an interesting legend associated with it, according to which, Lord Krishna – the head of the Yadav Clan, foretold Arjuna that a remote descendent of the Yadav Clan would build his kingdom atop the Trikuta Hill. His prophecy was fulfilled in 1156 AD when Rawal Jaisal, a descendent of the Yadav Clan and a Bhatti Rajput, abandoned his fort at Lodurva and founded a new capital – Jaisalmer, perched on the Trikuta Hill. His Yadav descent can be traced back to the Mahabharata and the Rajputs were famed for courage and gallantry.

Jaisalmer is studded with magnificent tourist haunts that encapsulates the vivacious culture of this lovely locale. It is laced with beautiful forts, sacred shrines, stately havelis reminiscent of the yester years, well stacked museums and a rippling lake. Reach and check in at hotel. Also visit the ROYAL CENOTAPHS and relax in the evening. Stay overnight at Jaisalmer.

Day 20: Jaisalmer
After a relaxed breakfast proceed for full day sightseeing tour of The Golden City - Jaisalmer. It is in the heart of the Great Indian Desert. Its temple, fort and palaces are all built of yellow stone. The city is a mass of intricately carved buildings, facades and elaborate balconies.

Visit the Jaisalmer Fort – The oldest living Fort in the world. (This is the highlight of the tour)

The fort stands almost 30 metres over the city and houses an entire living area within huge ramparts. Walking through the narrow lanes is an experience worth savouring. It is approached through Ganesh Pol, Suraj Pol, Bhoot Pol and Hawa Pol. Also, within it are many beautiful havelies and a group of Jain temples dating from the 12th to the 15th centuries. The golden - yellow sandstone of Jaisalmer Fort, over 800 years old, crowns the Trikuta Hill. Within its walls, defended by 99 turrets, lies the old city, nearly a quarter of modern Jaisalmer. Seen from outside, the sight must be almost identical to what was seen by merchants on their overland camel caravans to central Asia. Once this desert outpost was an important gate for the trade route, and Jaisalmer grew wealthy on the proceeds. But the advent of commercial shipping relegated the town to relative obscurity. Known as SONAR QUILA, rising from the sand , the mega structure merges with the golden hues of the desert ambience and the setting suns in its most colourful shades gives it a fairy tale look. Its simply a magic, the bastions envelops a whole townships that consist of palace complex various security sources and the havelis of rich merchants carved with an incredibly light touch, several temples and the residential complexes of the armies and traders placed strategically on the trade route, from where the ancient caravans passed.

Agra-Fort Enjoy the sightseeing of the following places out of which the Jain Temples are inside the fort.

Nathmal Ki Haveli: Two architect brothers built it in the 19th century. Interestingly, while one concentrated on the right, the other concentrated on the left and the result is a symphony epitomising the side by side symmetry during construction. Paintings in miniature style monopolise the walls in the interior. Mighty tuskers carved out of yellow sandstone stand guard to the haveli.

Salim Singh Ki Haveli: This haveli was built about 300 years ago and a part of it is still occupied. Salim Singh was the prime minister when Jaisalmer was the capital of the princely state and his mansion has a beautifully arched roof with superb carved brackets in the form of Peacocks. The mansion is just below the hill and it is said that once it had two additional wooden storeys in an attempt to make it as high as the maharaja's palace, but the maharaja had the upper storey torn down.

Patwon Ji Ki Haveli: This is one of the largest and most elaborate Haveli in Jaisalmer and stands in a narrow lane. It is five storeys high and is extensively carved. It is divided into six apartments, two owned by archaeological Survey of India, two by families who operate craft-shops and two private homes. There are remnants of paintings on some of the inside walls as well as some mirror work.

Tazia Tower: The delicate pagoda like Tazia Tower rises from Badal Mahal (Cloud Palace). Rising in its five-tiered splendor, with each storey graced by a delicately carved balcony, the tower is of historical significance. Muslim craftsmen built it in the shape of a Tazia and gifted it to their royal patron

Godi Sagar Lake: This tank, south of the city walls, once held the town water supply, and befitting its importance in providing precious water to the inhabitants of this arid city, it is surrounded by small temples and shrines. The beautiful yellow sandstone gateway arching across the road down to the tank is the Tilon-ki-Pol, and is said to have been built by a famous prostitute, Tilon. When she offered to pay to have this gateway constructed, the Maharaja refused permission under it to go down to the tank and he felt that this would be beneath his dignity. While he was away, she built the gate , adding a Krishna temple on top so that king could not tear it down.

Jain Temples: These fine Jain temples were built in the 12th to 15th century, within the Jaisalmer Fort. They are beautifully carved and dedicated to Rikhabdevji and Sambhavnathji. The Gyan Bhandar, a library containing some extremely old manuscripts, is within the temple complex.

In the late afternoon, proceed to the Sand Dunes for visiting the Typical Rajasthani Desert Village. View the sunset from the dunes, as the sky is set on fire. Return to the village for dinner amidst Rajasthani musicians playing haunting tunes.

Overnight will be at Jaisalmer.

Day 21: Jaisalmer
Breakfast will be at the hotel. Spend first half of the day in FORT and then proceed to explore the LODURVA VILLAGE in the desert.

In the afternoon, proceed to the SAND DUNES for a short CAMEL SAFARI visiting the typical Rajasthani Desert Village. View the sunset from the dunes, as the sky is set on fire.

Proceed to the camp for dinner amidst Rajasthani musicians playing haunting tunes. Return to the hotel and overnight will be at Jaisalmer.

Day 22: Jaisalmer - Jodhpur ( By Road 330 km/6 hr)

Proceed to Jodhpur in the morning after a leisurely breakfast at the camp.

Stop at Osiyan for sightseeing and lunch.

Osiyan was a religious and trading center between the 8th and 12th centuries. Sixteen Hindu and Jain temples dating from this period are located here. Dominated by the Jains during this period, the town has special significance for Jains because it is associated with the origin of the Oswal Jain community of merchants who became very wealthy through trade. This wealth enabled them to build the beautiful temples. Built from local sandstone, the buildings have withstood time and are in excellent condition. Reach Jodhpur by early evening.

Set at the edge of the Thar Desert, the imperial city of Jodhpur echoes with tales of antiquity in the emptiness of the desert. Once the capital of the Marwar state, it was founded in 1459 AD by Rao Jodha-chief of the Rathore clan of Rajputs who claimed to be descendants of Rama - the epic hero of the Ramayana. The massive 15th century AD Mehrangarh Fort looms on the top of a rocky hill, soaring 125 Mts. Above the plains. The city is encompassed by a high wall -10 km long with 8 gates and innumerable bastions. Overnight will be at Jodhpur.

Day 23: Jodhpur
Breakfast will be at the hotel.

Proceed for the sightseeing tour. Umaid Bhawan Palace: The romantic looking Umaid Bhawan Palace was actually built with the purpose of giving employment to the people of Jodhpur during a long drawn famine. The royal family of Jodhpur still lives in a part of the palace. Another part of the palace houses a well-maintained museum, displaying an amazing array of items belonging to the Maharaja and the royal family - weapons, antiques & fascinating clocks, crockery and trophies. Enjoy the sightseeing tour of the city.

Mehrangarh Fort: Situated on a steep hill, Mehrangarh fort is one of the largest forts in India. The beauty and the grandeur of numerous palaces in the fort narrates a saga of hard sandstones yielding to the chisels of skilled Jodhpuri sculptures. Mehrangarh Fort, spreading over 5 km on a perpendicular hill and looking down 125 meters, presents a majestic view on city horizon. It was built on advice of a saint in 1459 to establish an impregnable head-quarter. This Fort is one of the best in India with its exquisitely latticed windows, carved panels, elaborately adorned windows and walls of Moti Mahal, Phool Mahal, Sheesh Mahal. A collection of musical instruments, palanquins, royal costumes, furniture and the cannons on the fort's ramparts are well preserved.

Jaswant Thada:Close to the fort complex, lies Jaswant Thada. This 19th century royal cenotaph built in white marble in commemoration of Maharaja Jaswant Singh II and three other cenotaphs, stand nearby. The cenotaph of Maharaja Jaswant Singh holds the rare portraits of the rulers and Maharajas of Jodhpur. A visit inside the cenotaphs, with some villagers of the region, would bring forward the reverence they still hold for their brave kings. Overnight will be at Jodhpur.

Agra-Fort Day 24: Jodhpur - Udaipur (By Road 260 km/6 hr)

After breakfast drive to Udaipur.

En-route, visit the Ranakpur Temples, dating back to the 15th century. 200 pillars, none of which are alike, support its 29 halls. The Temple abounds with intricate friezes and sculptures. Includes visits to two more Jain temples and the Temple of the Sun God with its erotic sculptures. Reach Udaipur and check in at hotel.

The city of Dawn, Udaipur is a lovely land around the azure lake, hemmed in by the lush hills of the Aravallis. A vision in white drenched in romance and beauty, Udaipur is a fascinating blend of sights, sound and experiences and inspiration for the imagination of poets, painters and writers.

Its kaleidoscope of fairy-tale palaces, lakes, temples, gardens and narrow lanes strewn with stalls, carry the flavor of a heroic past, epitomizing valor and chivalry. Their reflection in the placid waters of the Lake Pichola is an enticing sight.

Udaipur is the jewel of Mewar -a kingdom ruled by the Sisodia dynasty for 1200 Years.

Relax in the evening. Overnight will be at Udaipur.

Day 25: Udaipur
Breakfast will be at hotel. Proceed for sightseeing tour of Udaipur, stopping first at City Palace.

City Palace: Standing on the east bank of lake Pichola, is a massive series of palaces built at different times from 1559 A.D. The balconies of the palace provide panoramic views of "Jag Niwas" (the world wide famous Lake palace hotel), Jag Mandir on one side and on the other the city of Udaipur. Its main entrance is through the triple-arched gate - the Tripolia, built in 1725. The way now leads to a series of courtyards, overlapping parations, terraces, corridors and gardens - a harmonic profusion hard to describe. There is a Suraj Gokhda, where the maharanas of Mewar presented themselves in the times of trouble to the people to restore confidence. The Mor-chowk (Peacock courtyard), gets its name from the vivid mosaics in glass decorating its walls. The chini chitrashala is noteworthy while a series of wall paintings of KRISHNA are on display in Bhim Vilas. There are numerous other palaces such as Dilkhush mahal, Sheesh mahal, Moti mahal and Krishna vilas - in memory of a princess of striking beauty who poisoned herself to avert a bloody battle for her hand by rival princess. Now the palace contains many antique articles, paintings, decorative furniture and utensils and attracts thousands of visitors every day. Here you will marvel at rooms with mirrored walls and ivory doors, colored glass windows and inlaid marble balconies and the Peacock Courtyard.

Saheliyon ki Bari: Maharana Sangram singh builds this in the mid 18th century. The 'garden of the maidens' brings to mind the lifestyle of the ladies of the court. The delightful gardens appear discreet and in impeccable taste. There are four pools with dainty kiosks, and all around are flowerbeds, lawns, pools and fountains protected by a series of walls and shady trees. The Foundation of the Sahelion ki bari functions solely by water pressure and no pumps are used. The garden has a lotus pool, a sitting room decorated with paintings and glass mosaics. The whole ambiences is flavored by the nostalgia of those beautiful bells enjoying themselves in a lavish aura.

Bagore ki Haveli:This is a very congenial old building built right on the waterfront of Lake Pichola at Gangori Ghat. Amir Chand Badwa, the Prime Minister of Mewar built it in the eighteenth century. The palace has over hundred rooms and some very interesting display of costumes and modern art. The glass and mirror in the interiors of the Haveli delicate work and well preserved too. It also preserves a fine example of Mewar Painting on the walls of Queen's Chamber. The two peacocks made from small pieces of colored glasses are fine examples of glasswork. After the death Badwa the building became the property of Mewar State. It came to be occupied by Maharana Shakti Singh of Bagore who built the palace of the three arches also in 1878 and it acquired its name of Bagore-ki-haveli, the house of Bagore. After independence the structure lay in neglect until 1986 when it housed the West Zne Cultural centre.

Jagdish Temple:The temple is situated in the middle of the city. The temple of Jagannath Rai, now called Jagdish-ji, is a major monument and should be seen carefully. Raised on a tall terrace and completed in 1651, it is a tribute alike to the tenacity of its builders and the resilence of the art tradition it represents. It attaches a double storeyed Mandapa (hall) to a double - storied, saandhara (that having a covered ambulatory) sanctum. The mandapa has another storey tucked within its pyramidal samavarna (bell - roof) while the hollow clustered spire over the sanctum contains two more, non - functional stories. Lanes taking off from many of the sheharpanah (city wall) converge on the Jagdish Temple and walking leisurely through them brings you face with the many layers of the cultural palimpsest that Udaipur is. It was built by Maharana Jagat Singh Ist in 1651 A.D. Proceed for Evening Motor launch cruise on the placid waters of Lake Pichola. From the boat you will be able to view the city of Udaipur as it rises majestically above the lake in the middle of the Rajasthan desert. Also visit the Jag Mandir Palace - the other island palace in the middle of the lake. Spend some time at the Jag Mandir Palace. Overnight will be at Udaipur.

Day 26: Udaipur - Deogarh (By Road 120 km/2 hr)
Proceed to Deogarh after breakfast.

Deogarh lies on the borders of Mewar, Marwar and Merwara, about 80 miles north-east of Udaipur. Its chieftain known as 'The Rawat' was one of sixteen umraos (feudal barons) privileged to wait upon the Maharana of Udaipur, the capital of Mewar. Such feudal estates, called thikanas were granted by the ruling Maharana to a nobleman either due to blood relationship or for an act of bravery. Deogarh is also renowned as a school of miniature painting. Some Deogarh miniatures adorn the personal collection of the present Rawat Sahib. Frescoes of this art form can also be seen on the fort walls. The Mahal also has some exciting rooms to browse through - Sheesh Mahal - the colourful hall of mirrors, is just one of them.

Deogarh Mahal is an imposing structure built in the 17th century. It stands atop a hill and offers a commanding view of the Aravalli mountain range and the numerous lakes, strewn across the countryside. With its old battlements, domes, turrets, jharokhas and huge gateways, it is a picturesque sight from the town below. At a height of about 2100 ft above sea level, it is cooler than surrounding Rajasthan. Built in 1670 A.D. by Rawat Dwarka Dasji as a family residence, it soon became the hub of village activity. The family interacted with the villagers and invited a host of feasts and festivities to be performed within the Mahal precincts. Some of these traditions are still practiced. And the gates, that always remained closed, to ward off enemies, are now open to the guests.

Deogarh Mahal was converted into a hotel about 3 years ago, by the present owner Rawal-Nahar Singh. A part of the Mahal is still occupied by his kin. The family is closely associated with the hotel and personally supervises and monitors the on goings. The care is reflected in the minutest details which have made Deogarh a benchmark of Heritage Hospitality in Rajasthan.

Enjoy your day walking the town and meeting the villagers. Overnight will be at the Deogarh Mahal.

Day 27: Deogarh - Chattrasagar (By Road 150 km/4 hr)
Breakfast will be at the palace. Proceed for sightseeing of the place around the town.

Anjaneshwar Mahadev: It is an extraordinary cave temple believed to be 2,000 years old. This ruined temple is situated on an island in the Raghosagar Lake.

Gokal Vilas:This magnificent palace situated over a hillock is the home of the present Rawat. Set in a picturesque locale around Raghosagar Lake, the palace is around 200 years old.
Drive to Chattrasagar.

The fort of Nimaj was built in 1733 by the valiant ruler- Thakur Jagram Singh. Situated in the heart of the town, it is a massive structure built in traditional Rajput style with courtyards and separate wings for men & women. The little township is surrounded by places of historical interest, like the 9th century temple Magar Mandi, 3 kms away. Visit nearby villages to see local craftsmen at work & a little further see blackbucks, blue bulls etc.

Lakes in the desert region are a rarity having their own charm. Chhatra Sagar, 4 kms from the fort is a beautiful water body nestled between two hillocks. Built as a summer retreat, the lush green lawn, flowering trees and clear waters are like an oasis in the otherwise dry region. Boating and angling is possible. It is surrounded by lush green fields and vast grazing pastures. Chhatra Sagar, a hundred-year old reservoir with a periphery of about 10 kilometers, is an ideal destination for nature lovers and a perfect getaway from the chaotic city life.

As a hunting preserve of the Nimaj Estate, Chhatra Sagar has witnessed many exciting shikar camps and leisure parties. Today, the campsite, situated on the dam, offers breathtaking views of the sunrise, sunset and the Aravalli ranges on the horizon. The old shooting box - Aodhi has been put to good use as it provides a closer view of the water fowl and birds of prey.

Relax in the tastefully designed and well-appointed tented accommodation. Each tent has an attached bath with running hot and cold water, and its own private sit out overlooking the lake. Overnight will be at the camp.

Day 28: Chattrasagar
Enjoy the day at Chattrasagar. Watch the birds, go for nature walks, soak in the fresh air, sit around the bonfire and listen to old folk lore - or be more adventurous and take one of the many safaris on offer.

Experience the warm hospitality, and enjoy some truly delicious Indian and traditional Rajasthani meals cooked with farm fresh vegetables in the family kitchen. Overnight will be at Chattrasagar.

Agra-Fort Day 29: Chattrasagar – Jaipur (By Road 150 km/4 hr)
Enjoy breakfast at the camp and drive to Jaipur.

Jaipur is the capital of the state of Rajasthan a romantic realm of resplendent palaces, mighty fortresses and regal Maharajahs that lies in the western deserts and is an utterly unique part of India. Proudly belonging to the Kshatriya warrior caste and fiercely independent, the Rajput princes made fearsome foes. However, many of them realized that to maintain their wealth and authority locally, it was expedient to proclaim allegiance to the central power. Thus, many enjoyed a privileged position under the Mughal emperors and also the British Raj that followed.

The bustling Rajasthan capital of Jaipur takes its name from its venerated founder Jai Singh II, who was given the title Sawai Maharaja by the Mughal. Literally translated this would mean ’one and a quarter’, suggesting that the Mughal thought this emperor to be more valuable than just ‘one’. Jaipur is known as the ’Pink City’ on account of the distinctive colour of its buildings. This did not, however, form part of the original plan, but dates back to 1856, when the city was given a wash of pink in honor of a State Visit from Prince Albert.

This evening, visit the Birla Temple to learn more about the fascinating religious life of Jaipur. The marble structure, built as recently as 1985, houses ornate statues including one of Lakshmi (goddess of Wealth and Beauty) and Narayan dressed in gaudy robes, representing a Hindu vision of heavenly luxury. Carvings in the temple and on pillars supporting the covered walkways include images of the Hindu pantheon, as well as Jesus, the Blessed Virgin Mary and St Francis of Assisi. Your visit will coincide with the AARTI Ceremony, which involves oil lamps being lit and waved, in order to awake and invoke the deity.

Enjoy the experience and spend night at Jaipur. Overnight will be in Jaipur.

Day 30: Jaipur
Proceed for a morning excursion to Amber Fort after breakfast. Elephant ride ascent to the fort.

Amber Fort Palace – Amber is the classic romantic Rajasthani fort palace. Its construction was started by Man Singh I in 1592, and completed by his descendent Jai Singh I. Its forbidding exterior belies an inner paradise where a beautiful fusion of Mughal and Hindu styles finds its ultimate expression. At the foot of the hill you will mount your caparisoned elephant for the slow but steady climb up to the main gate, making your entrance in the time honoured fashion. The Fort, completed in the early 18th century, took over 100 years to build and now, although deserted, offers a fascinating insight into the lifestyle of the Moghul ruling families. Continue sightseeing.

City Palace - A delightful blend of Mughal and traditional Rajasthani architecture, the City Palace sprawls over one-seventh of the area in the walled city. It houses the Chandra Mahal, Shri Govind Dev Temple and the City Palace Museum.

Jantar Mantar - This is the largest and the best preserved of the five observatories built by Jai Singh II in different parts of the country. This observatory consisting of outsized astronomical instruments is still in use.

Hawa Mahal - The ornamental facade of this "Palace of Winds" is a prominent landmark in Jaipur. It is a five-storey structure of sandstone plastered pink encrusted with fine trelliswork and elaborate balconies. The palace has 953 niches and windows. Built in 1799 by Pratap Singh, the Mahal was a royal grandstand for the palace women.

This afternoon is free for you to relax, shop or explore independently.

In the evening enjoy a cycle rickshaw ride through the bustling bazaars. Jaipur is renowned for textile block printing, blue pottery, carpet weaving, semi-precious stones and local crafts which still thrive from the day of Maharaja Jai Singh's patronage when he designed special areas in the city for the 'bandhanas', the 'cheepas' and the 'meenakari' workers.
Overnight will be at Jaipur.

Day 31: Jaipur – Ranthambhore (By Road 175 km/4 hr)
Drive to Ranthambhore after a leisurely breakfast.

Aravalis and the Vindhyas, is a unique example of natural and historical richness, standing out conspicuously in the vast, arid and denuded tract of eastern Rajasthan, barely 14 kilometers from Sawai Madhopur. Get in tune with nature for a luxury holiday in the heart of the jungle. Most of the resorts are close to the National Park Gate, Tiger Den being the closest.

It spreads over a highly undulating topography varying from gentle to steep slopes; from flat topped hills of the Vindhyas to the conical hillocks and sharp ridges of the Aravalis, from wide and flat valleys to narrow rocky gorges. An important geological feature the ‘Great Boundary Fault’ where the Vindhya plateaus meet the Aravali Hill range meanders through the Reserve. The National Park is bound by the rivers Chambal in the south and Banas in the north.

Tiger, at the apex of the food chain, lord over the kingdom in a subtle way. Solitary by nature, it operates in stealth. Therefore tiger sightings, frequent as they are, are always a matter of chance. However, even evidences of tiger's activities are very exciting.

Reach before lunch and check in at the resort. Enjoy the afternoon safari in the park tracking wildlife and tigers. Overnight will be at Ranthambhore.

Day 32: Ranthambhore
Wake up early morning and leave for your safari into the National Park. Track the tigers and other wildlife through the morning. Return to the resort / lodge by 1000 in the morning and have breakfast.

Freshen up and either you can time at the pool or visit the town. You could also go for a nice visit to the temple on top of the fort.

In the afternoon have lunch and then leave again for you afternoon safari. The safari will be till evening 1700 – 1800 hr and then return to the resort / lodge.

Dinner will be at the resort and retire early for the night. Overnight will be at the beautiful resort.

Day 33: Ranthambhore – Agra (By Road 250 km/6 hr )
Drive to Agra after breakfast visiting Fatehpur Sikri en-route.

The deserted, red Sandstone City, Emperor Akbar built that as his capital and palace in the late 16th century is an exhilarating experience. It a veritable fairytale city and its "ruins" are in pristine condition ... it’s not hard to imagine what the court life must have been like in the days of its grandeur. Also visit the Bulund Darwaza, the largest gateway in the world.

Continue your drive to Agra and on arrival check-in at Hotel.

AGRA: Two great Mughal monarchs, Akbar and Shah Jahan, transformed the little village of Agra into a befitting second capital of the Mughal Empire - giving it the name Dar-ul-Khilafat {seat of the Emperor}. Today a visitor to Agra is caught up in a world of contrasting edifices, of red sandstone and white marble, narrow galleys and quaint buggies, and that irresistible charm that this favorite city of the Mughals still retains. It is not surprising, that modern Agra still reflects its Mughal heritage most conspicuously.

A walk down the narrow bustling streets of the city will introduce the visitor to the wafting aroma of Mughlai cuisine.
Overnight will be at Agra.

Day 34: Agra:
Breakfast will be at hotel. Proceed for day sightseeing of Agra.

Taj Mahal: Little needs to be said about this architectural wonder which is always the soul raison-de-etre for every tourist's visit to Agra. Built by Shah Jahan, the Taj is a white marble memorial to his beautiful wife Mumtaz Mahal. This monument took 22 years to be completed and was designed, and planned by Persian architect Ustad Isa. Apart from its stunning design balance and perfect symmetry, the Taj is also noted particularly for its elegant domes, intricately carved screens and some of the best inlay work ever seen.

Agra Fort - Built by the famed Mughal emperor Akbar in 1565 AD, the fort is predominantly of red sandstone. Ensconced within is the picture perfect Pearl Mosque, which is a major tourist attraction. It lies on the bend of the river Yamuna, almost in the heart of the town. Akbar built it as his citadel over the years 1563-73 in the finest architectural style. It has imposing gates and walls of red sandstone and a moat.

After Agra Fort we will visit Baby Taj – The interiors of which are considered better than the Taj.

Spend night at Agra.

Day 35: Agra - Delhi - Departure (By Road 201 km/4 hr)
Breakfast will be at the hotel. Morning will be free for last minute shopping or a photography tour. Proceed to Delhi by noon and reach by evening. Proceed for Farewell Dinner and then take international flight home.


TOUR ENDS

THE TOUR INCLUDES:
  1. ACCOMMODATION AT SUGGESTED HOTELS,
  2. DAILY BREAKFAST AT HOTEL
  3. SIGHTSEEING TOURS AS MENTIONED IN THE ITINERARY,,
  4. ENGLISH SPEAKING GUIDES
  5. PRIVATE CAR WITH DRIVER
  6. CHANDNI CHOWK RICKSHAW RIDE
  7. ELEPHANT SAFARI IN JAIPUR
  8. BATTERY VAN RIDE IN AGRA
  9. CAMEL SAFARI IN JAISALMER
  10. BOAT RIDE ON SACRED RIVER GANGES
  11. LIGHT AND SOUND SHOW IN KHAJURAHO
  12. ALL APPLICABLE TAXES AND SERVICE CHARGES
  13. ALL ROAD TAXES, GOVERNMENT TAXES AND DRIVER ALLOWANCES,
  14. ONE FAREWELL DINNER FROM TNS GROUP.
EXCLUDES:
Lunches and dinners are not included (except where mentioned in the inclusion list) along with personal expenses, camera, etc. tips, (if any) at places where applicable. All hotels are subject to availability and all flights are subject to confirmation. Airfare is included in the tour price. It is not separate.

 
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